Access PanAm is hiring a Chilean Regional Director – Apply now!

ANNOUNCEMENT

Access PanAm is hiring Regional Directors – Apply now!
Acceso PanAm (APA) is hiring one Regional Directors to lead its programs in Chile. Acceso PanAm is a climber’s access and conservation organization dedicated to keeping climbing areas open and protecting the mountains and crags in all Latin America, from Mexico to Patagonia.

The regional directors job is:

  • To directly organize and support access and conservation campaigns,
  • To support local climbing communities, and
  • To create chapters/affiliates of APA that will promote its mission to protect climbing access and conserve the climbing environment.
  • To work with and report directly to the Executive Director.

This is a part-time position, involving up to 60 hours per month, and 10 months a year work and pay. Modest travel/actions stipend available.

Individuals will be selected for their commitment to defend climbing, ability to lead and inspire the climbing community, and willingness to travel frequently.

We encourage individuals who are passionate about climbing and protecting the places where we climb to apply.

Send resume (including a section on climbing experience), references, and cover letter specifically addressing your qualifications to kika@accesspanam.com by 02/26/2016. For further information, send an e-mail to: apa@accesspanam.com, skype: aribira, phone: +55 21 99221-8741. Send applications in English or Spanish.

Regional Directors Responsibilities

  • Represent Acceso PanAm in the region to local climbers, climbing organizations/federations, community/conservation organizations, and land managers.
  • Create and direct affiliates or chapters of Acceso PanAm. This means recruiting and motivating volunteers, without doing the work of volunteers. Includes maintaining membership records.
  • Organize on the ground, grassroots climbing advocacy campaigns.
  • Organize two conservation campaigns, such as cleanups and trail projects per year
  • Travel to climbing areas to meet with land managers and work with local climbers, climbing organizations/federations, and community/conservation organizations.
  • Produce web content (photo and articles) for Acceso PanAm and its partners.
  • Small Spanish translations.

Benefits

  • Salary of $500/month
  • Pro-deals with qualifying outdoor industry corporate partners

Required Qualifications

  • Passionate, commitment to climbing and climbing access/conservation.
  • Familiarity with climbing practices, policy issues, and management.
  • Ability to work independently with proven time and task management skills.
  • Excellent communication skills (written and verbal) including public speaking and relating to diverse communities.
  • Fluent Spanish speaking and writing. Fluent English reader-writer.
  • Ability to be diplomatic, calm, and thoughtful in contentious situations.
  • Ability to represent Acceso PanAm and the climbing community in a positive, professional manner.
  • Willingness to travel to project locations.
  • Ability to negotiate rough, uneven, undeveloped terrain typical of climbing areas and approaches to climbing areas.
  • Access to internet and Skype for meetings.

Preferred Qualifications

  • Previous Attendance at APA Training Programs (Capacitación)
  • Experience with local access/conservations campaigns, grassroots advocacy, and/or lobbying.
  • Experience with climbing organizations.
  • Volunteer management skills.
  • Extensive climbing experience.
  • Experience with land management and climbing issues.
  • Native Spanish speaker; Fluent English speaker; and basic understanding of Portuguese.

Gaining Momentum – PWM 7th week

IMG_6763The project continues to gain great momentum and support. The team has been able to get all of the wood to site with the help of Argentina Parques National (APN). After getting the foundation finished the base of he structure was added. Then a month and half of cutting, staining, and carrying wood took shape in front of our eyes. Over the course of two days the team (including Ex. Director Kika Bradford) were able to get the four walls up and beams for the roof on. A massive step forward.

In this time the crew has also been able to enjoy what the park has to offer. With the great weather in January the team has been backpacking through the entire front range of the park, climbing in the Torre valley on Aguja Media Luna.

IMG_6782Kika already left us, but has squeezed a lot in during her time here. She has helped in the field as well as creating awareness about the project. Kika ran a town meeting, attended by 17 people, including local guides, climbers, the El Chaltén Climbing Club, and representatives from the Town Environmental Committee. She also presented the project to about 10 park volunteers. The Park and local organizations in town now are getting involved with Access PanAm.

The team is looking forward to the arrival of Geoff Hill PHD at the end of the month. When Geoff arrives the team will be able to install the mechanical portion of the toilet and begin testing.

Thank you to everyone for following our progress!

Read about the project here. Watch the trailer here.

Also thank you to our our sponsors!

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Patagonia Waste Management – Trailer

Our volunteer team has been on the ground building the toilet at Laguna Capri, Los Glaciares National Park, for almost two months now. Check out the trailer.

Patagonia Waste Management – Trailer from Acceso PanAm on Vimeo.

Ventanas and Walls – Patagonia Waste Management

IMG_6697 (1)The new year arrived with the good weather, a long “ventana” (a window of good weather), a Torre attempt, and walls. Acceso PanAm’s Executive Director, Kika Bradford, arrived and joined the team on the task to build the toilet. After portering the last of the wood-cuts to Capri, the team started and finished building the walls. Motivation is high!

Read about the project here.

Black Diamondpatagonia-logo TTS LOGO long (email sig)

 

IMG_6621 (1) IMG_6637 (1) IMG_6647 (1) IMG_6663 (1) IMG_6687 (1)

 

Off to a Great Start – the Patagonia Waste Management Project

IMG_6178

Building the foundations

After two weeks in Patagonia, the volunteer team in El Chaltén, Parque Nacional Los Glaciares have made amazing progress in making the
vermi-composting toilet. With the help of Alejandro and Arístides (Park employees), Rolo Garibotti, other National Park employees, and others in El Chaltén, the volunteers have made this project a reality.

IMG_6068

Choosing a location

The chosen location for the toilet is Laguna Capri, a campground 1 hour from the town of El Chaltén. It is a great stop to test the toilet, because it sees a lot of traffic as is a very popular area for both day hikers and campers. 

In addition to the location, all of the wood cuts for the base, studs and floor are nearly completed to be able to slide it all together and bolt it up onsite. The pit for the toilet is dug halfway and will be finishing soon. The team is excited to keep charging forward to finish construction and bring everything to Capri to put it all together!

Read about the project here.

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Digging the future toilet area

Digging the future toilet area

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The current toilet

 


 

 

Doug Tompkins, Climber and creator of parks in Patagonia Doug Tompkins, the American climber and single-handed conservationist of more than two million acres across Patagonia, died on December 8, following a kayak accident in Argentina.


DougTompkins(2)
Doug Tompkins, the American climber and single-handed conservationist of more than two million acres across Patagonia, died on December 8, following a kayak accident in Argentina.

Doug Tompkins, the American climber and single-handed conservationist of more than two million acres across Patagonia, died on December 8, following a kayak accident on Lago General Carrera, on the Chilean-Argenine border. Doug, along with five companions, including Yvon Chouinard, the founder of Patagonia, capsized in rough weather. He was rescued by helicopter, but succumbed to severe hypothermia. He was 72.

Doug grew up in Millbrook, New York. In 1964, he founded The North Face to make and sell outdoor equipment. Doug first came to Chile in 1961 to ski race; he returned numerous times in the following decades, gaining experience of the country’s wildest rivers and mountains.

In 1968, he headed south on a road trip to Patagonia to climb Mt. Fitz Roy, surfing, skiing, and climbing along DougTompkins(1)the way, an adventure documented in the film Mountain of Storms. Tompkins established the California Route on Fitz Roy with Yvon Chouinard, Richard Dorworth, Chris Jones, and Lito Tejada Flores. He fell in love with the region and took on a personal responsibility to protect it.

In the 1990s, Doug began buying up large tracts of land in a Chilean rainforest with the fortune he amassed from the sale of another hugely successful he had co-founded, the women’s wear brand Esprit. He said he was done “making clothes and countless things no one needs.” Doug claimed he didn’t make much money on the sale of The North Face.

In Chile, as in Argentina, Tompkins inspired suspicion, resentment, and at last, admiration.  With his second wife, Kris McDivitt Tompkins, the CEO of the clothing company Patagonia, Tompkins bought over 2 million acres of land in Patagonia to set aside for conservation, with the hopes of one day building a national park.

Few Chileans believed that someone would take millions of acres of land out of production, return it to a natural state, and give it to the government for free. The Tompkins faced accusations ranging from working for the CIA to stealing Chile’s water to ship to Africa.

DougTompkinsToday, Pumalín Park is well-visited by Chileans and foreign tourists. Official Chile eventually came around. Working with Chilean conservationists and the government, the Tompkins conserved nearly 2.2 million acres across the Patagonia region and won national park status for three parks that didn’t exist before they got involved.

According to many sources, the Tompkins have protected more land than any other private individuals in history.

Doug was a man of passion and vision. Among his climbing and kayaking friends he was famous, or infamous, for his boldness – as one of them put it, “He had a balls to brain ratio that was unmatched.” In the classic Fitz Roy film, as the climbers start the final push to the summit, Doug is heard to say: “Today’s the day, boys, today’s the day.” Chris Jones, one of Doug’s partners on the Fitz Roy climb, said, “that is exactly what I remember him saying – he was so damn enthusiastic, so excited.”

He always brought great wine on any trip. “Doug arrived at our wedding reception with a case of Chianti Classico hoisted on his shoulders,“ remembers Chris Jones. “The perfect gift. It was always special when we pulled out another bottle of Doug’s wine.”

 

 

 

 

Acceso PanAm’s New Project: Sustainability in El Chaltén

PWM-logo-webAccess PanAm’s Patagonia Waste Management seeks solutions for human waste in the Chaltén Massif and we need you support.

GOAL: To find a sustainable, simple, inexpensive option to manage human waste in a location that is cold, remote, and has no septic systems or transport via helicopter sling loads. The team will be in  implementing a test vermi-composting toilet this January

Read more about the project and ways you can help here.

Access PanAm is hiring Regional Directors – Apply now!

ANNOUNCEMENT

Access PanAm is hiring Regional Directors – Apply now!
Acceso PanAm (APA) is hiring Regional Directors to lead its programs in the Andes and Patagonia regions. Acceso PanAm is a climber’s access and conservation organization dedicated to keeping climbing areas open and protecting the mountains and crags in all Latin America, from Mexico to Patagonia.

The regional directors job is:

  • To directly organize and support access and conservation campaigns,
  • To support local climbing communities, and
  • To create chapters/affiliates of APA that will promote its mission to protect climbing access and conserve the climbing environment.
  • To work with and report directly to the Executive Director.

The Andes regional director must live in Columbia, Ecuador, or Peru;
The Patagonia coordinator must live in Argentina or Chile.

This is a part-time position, involving up to 60 hours per month, and 10 months a year work and pay. Modest travel/actions stipend available.

Individuals will be selected for their commitment to defend climbing, ability to lead and inspire the climbing community, and willingness to travel frequently.

We encourage individuals who are passionate about climbing and protecting the places where we climb to apply.

Send resume (including a section on climbing experience), references, and cover letter specifically addressing your qualifications to kika@accesspanam.com by 10/23/2015. For further information, send an e-mail to: apa@accesspanam.com, skype: aribira, phone: +55 21 99221-8741.
Send applications in English or Spanish.

Regional Directors Responsibilities

  • Represent Acceso PanAm in the region to local climbers, climbing organizations/federations, community/conservation organizations, and land managers.
  • Create and direct affiliates or chapters of Acceso PanAm. This means recruiting and motivating volunteers, without doing the work of volunteers. Includes maintaining membership records.
  • Organize on the ground, grassroots climbing advocacy campaigns.
  • Organize two conservation campaigns, such as cleanups and trail projects per year
  • Travel to climbing areas to meet with land managers and work with local climbers, climbing organizations/federations, and community/conservation organizations.
  • Produce web content (photo and articles) for Acceso PanAm and its partners.
  • Small Spanish translations.

Benefits

  • Salary of $500/month
  • Pro-deals with qualifying outdoor industry corporate partners

Required Qualifications

  • Passionate, commitment to climbing and climbing access/conservation.
  • Familiarity with climbing practices, policy issues, and management.
  • Ability to work independently with proven time and task management skills.
  • Excellent communication skills (written and verbal) including public speaking and relating to diverse communities.
  • Fluent Spanish speaking and writing. Fluent English reader-writer.
  • Ability to be diplomatic, calm, and thoughtful in contentious situations.
  • Ability to represent Acceso PanAm and the climbing community in a positive, professional manner.
  • Willingness to travel to project locations.
  • Ability to negotiate rough, uneven, undeveloped terrain typical of climbing areas and approaches to climbing areas.
  • Access to internet and Skype for meetings.

Preferred Qualifications

  • Previous Attendance at APA Training Programs (Capacitación)
  • Experience with local access/conservations campaigns, grassroots advocacy, and/or lobbying.
  • Experience with climbing organizations.
  • Volunteer management skills.
  • Extensive climbing experience.
  • Experience with land management and climbing issues.
  • Native Spanish speaker; Fluent English speaker; and basic understanding of Portuguese.

 

New Educational Campaign in Brazil

São Bento do Sapucaí climbers created a new educational campaign for the approaching season:

Campaña de educacíón de los escaladores, en Brasil.

 

Article about Risk and Liability

Climbing in Brazil

Climbing in Brazil

One of the major issues in the climbing world today has to do with liability and risk. Traditionally, climbing is related to freedom and autonomy; self-awareness and responsibility; judgment and decision-making. However, the fear of liability has imprinted its marks in the sport. Many restrictions have been created, and many more are in the verge of being created. In Brazil, some of these restrictions threaten the very practice of climbing as we know it.

In this piece André Ilha* writes about many of these threats and presents arguments that are both against them and pro adventure sports. He does not focus only on climbing, but all the arguments apply. The piece is also written for debating Brazil’s legislation, but most all the issues and arguments can be applied elsewhere.

Download the whole article The right to risk here.

A short version in Spanish: click here.
For the original piece, in Portuguese, click here.
A shorter version, in Portuguese, can be seen here.

*André Ilha is a long time Brazilian climber, who is always leading climbing routes, policies and politics. André has set up  620+ climbing routes all over Brazil. Today, he is also the Director for Biodiversity and Protected Areas at the Rio de Janeiro State Environmental Agency (INEA).

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